The Hirsch Paradox | Greg Ashman

Educational academics should really love E. D. Hirsch Jr. His writing supplies powerful arguments in favour of a broad and balanced curriculum, against some forms of standardised testing and against the idea of school as preparation for work; subjects that have been of concern to academics for many years and especially since the advent of … Continue reading The Hirsch Paradox

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Computer marking of writing probably won’t work | Greg Ashman

There has been something of a storm in Australia about a proposal to have computers mark the NAPLAN writing assessment. Initially, scripts will all be marked by both a teacher and a computer but, in time, the hope is that teachers will no longer be needed. If it works, it will be an advance. We … Continue reading Computer marking of writing probably won’t work

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A key flaw in the idea of comparing effect sizes | Greg Ashman

I was alerted* to a new paper by Hans Luyten, Christine Merrell and Peter Tymms about effect sizes. Effect sizes get bandied around a lot in education and many will have heard of John Hattie’s figure of d=.40 (0.4 of a standard deviation) as an effect size worth having. However, this is pretty blunt. We know, … Continue reading A key flaw in the idea of comparing effect sizes

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Are teachers’ stories believable? | Greg Ashman

I’m an advocate for teacher voice. I worry about teachers being excluded from the education debate and so I encourage new bloggers and argue against policies that restrict the expression of professional opinions. As a profession, we seem to have little say, with plenty of outsiders wanting to speak on our behalf. My own hypothesis […]

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Are teachers’ stories believable? | Greg Ashman

I’m an advocate for teacher voice. I worry about teachers being excluded from the education debate and so I encourage new bloggers and argue against policies that restrict the expression of professional opinions. As a profession, we seem to have little say, with plenty of outsiders wanting to speak on our behalf. My own hypothesis … Continue reading Are teachers’ stories believable?

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http://ift.tt/2zsR7pH