My best planning. Part 1 | Kris Boulton

Craig Barton interviewed me recently, during which I discussed a series of lessons I planned and taught on solving simultaneous equations.

I could be wrong, but I think this was the best planning and teaching I ever did.

Several people have asked if I would share examples of what I described during the interview, so I’m adding that here. It’s a bit lengthy, but hopefully provides the detail many people were asking for, as well as some insight into how Siegfried Engelmann’s Theory of Instruction can be applied to the classroom.

I’m splitting the post into four parts:
Specification of…

Continue reading here:

http://ift.tt/2wDfQpQ

My best planning. Part 1 | Kris Boulton

Craig Barton interviewed me recently, during which I discussed a series of lessons I planned and taught on solving simultaneous equations.

I could be wrong, but I think this was the best planning and teaching I ever did.

Several people have asked if I would share examples of what I described during the interview, so I’m adding that here. It’s a bit lengthy, but hopefully provides the detail many people were asking for, as well as some insight into how Siegfried Engelmann’s Theory of Instruction can be applied to the classroom.

I’m splitting the post into four parts:
Specification of…

Continue reading here:

http://ift.tt/2wDfQpQ

Maths: Conceptual understanding first, or procedural fluency? | Kris Boulton

Should you teach conceptual understanding first, or focus on raw procedural fluency?

This question drives endless debate in maths education, but its answer is very straightforward: it depends.

I can demonstrate this quickly and easily with a single example, by teaching you how to multiply logadeons (e.g. 5-:-9,) something you’re probably not familiar with already.

Observe the following examples:
8-:-20     *   2-:-5       = 10-:-25
9-:-20     *   2-:-5       = 11-:-25
100-:-50 *   30-:-7     = 130-:-57
19-:-20    *   5-:-5      = 24-:-25

By this point, you can probably multiply…

Continue reading here:

http://ift.tt/2s0dHTd

Maths: Conceptual understanding first, or procedural fluency? | Kris Boulton

Should you teach conceptual understanding first, or focus on raw procedural fluency?

This question drives endless debate in maths education, but its answer is very straightforward: it depends.

I can demonstrate this quickly and easily with a single example, by teaching you how to multiply logadeons (e.g. 5-:-9,) something you’re probably not familiar with already.

Observe the following examples:
8-:-20     *   2-:-5       = 10-:-25
9-:-20     *   2-:-5       = 11-:-25
100-:-50 *   30-:-7     = 130-:-57
19-:-20    *   5-:-5      = 24-:-25

By this point, you can probably multiply…

Continue reading here:

http://ift.tt/2s0dHTd

Never ask pupils a question to which they have not already been told the answer. | Kris Boulton

Never ask pupils a question to which they have not already been told the answer, unless they know enough that answering the question requires them only inching forwards.

Years ago I wrote on questions and questioning, a seemingly important aspect of teaching.  For anyone interested, here:

28th May 2013

29th May 2013

16th June 2013

15th March 2014

Which is really all to say that despite the irreverence, three years on and the question of questions hasn’t disappeared.

At this point, I would say they are a vitally important part of teaching.  During my training I was told that they…

Continue reading here:

http://ift.tt/2pP3wzn

Never ask pupils a question to which they have not already been told the answer. | Kris Boulton

Never ask pupils a question to which they have not already been told the answer, unless they know enough that answering the question requires them only inching forwards.

Years ago I wrote on questions and questioning, a seemingly important aspect of teaching.  For anyone interested, here:

28th May 2013

29th May 2013

16th June 2013

15th March 2014

Which is really all to say that despite the irreverence, three years on and the question of questions hasn’t disappeared.

At this point, I would say they are a vitally important part of teaching.  During my training I was told that they…

Continue reading here:

http://ift.tt/2owM7dN

Why we need to get rid of lesson objectives | Kris Boulton

The problem of Juxtaposition Prompting

In sum:
1) The problem of Juxtaposition Prompting is endemic in our classrooms. It prevents generalisation and transfer, and therefore what we consider ‘deep understanding’ or ‘deep thinking.’
2) To overcome it, we must reconsider old lesson and curriculum structures, to carefully introduce greater variation into lessons, which will require us to remove lesson objectives as we know them.

Give this a go, if you like.

From brilliant.org

When I tried it three thoughts came to mind. First, this can definitely be solved using trig. Second, I…

Continue reading here:

http://ift.tt/2pdxNuQ